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Search Results 0 to 33 of about 34 (some duplicates have been removed)
stem cell science. >> this bill would support the taking of innocent human life, so i vetoed it. >> you know, when you're talking about the potential to heal and cure so many and it not going forward, it pissed me off and i wanted to do something. >> michael j. fox. >> now the politics have changed, but the quest for a cure continues. >> how close are we? we're a lot closer than we were ten years ago. a lot closer. >> tonight ofrontline, correspondent dave iverson tracks the pursuit of parkinson's and his own family journey. >> frontline is made possible by contributions to your pbs station from viewers like you. thank you. and by the corporation for public broadcasting. major funding is provided by the john d. and catherine t. macarthur foundation, committed building a more just, rdant and peaceful world. and by reva and david logan, committed to investigative journalism as the guardian of the public interest. additional funding is provided by the park foundation, dedicated to heightening public awareness of critical issues. and by tfrontline journalism fund, supporting investi
that that dollar is wisely spent. i think they stand for civil rights. i know they're all for education in science and training, which i strongly support. they want these young people to have a chance to get jobs and the rest. i think the business community wants to get involved. i think they're asking for new and creative ways to try to reach it with everyone involved. i think that's part of it. i think also that the american people want a balanced program that gives us long-term growth so that they're not having to take money that's desperate to themselves and their families and give it to someone else. i'm opposed to that, too. >> and now it is time for our rebuttal for this period. mr. president? >> yes. the connection that's been made again between the deficit and the interest rates -- there is no connection between them. there is a connection between interest rates and inflation, but i would call to your attention that in 1981 while we were operating still on the carter-mondale budget that we inherited -- that the interest rates came down from 211/2, down toward the 12 or 13 figure. and whil
their heads thinking there is no way this could possibly work. the practices have no basis in science or medicine and they will now be relegated to the dust bin of quackery, your governor, david, is calling what you do quackery. can you just react to that and tell me how this new law will affect what you do? >> yes. let me tell you what kind of governor we have now. so, for instance, if a child is -- let me tell you first, any good competent therapist knows that homosexual feelings can result when one -- i'm talking about boys now, when one is raped or sexually molested. later in life, those feelings come up. what our governor decided now he knows best that the kind of profound affective therapy is quackery, that handles this kind of situation. >> david, how about the american psychiatric -- forgive me, i'll add on to the governor, the american psychiatric association says the potential risk of reparative therapy is great including depression, anxiety, self-destructive behavior, reparative therapy, this is the truth wins out, reparative therapy is junk science winning out by religious
does. a lot of people in here, remember the question in political science 101, should be elected representative do what he believes is right or what constituents because right? you could answer the question one way or the other. the important thing to take with them it is -- [inaudible] nobody wants to run for office so they can -- a robot into the you what to be a candidate because you believe in something. whatever you want to do. nobody wants you to just pull the lever for what the constituents you to do. so all a super pac and would do is identify places where the elected representative has gone too far from his constituency, and then educate the electorate about how the elected representative is sideways with the public opinion and the people. so you take that crossroads add, we're running it in all the states talk about the president has had this tennis program. testing this thing was wildly unpopular, and all the ads is hold the president or another elected official to account for what they did. it can't change public opinion about the stimulus legislation that we can iden
problem with things that are preventable in health care. areason's i got into this of the science of medical mistakes -- ever since i got into this area of science of medical mistakes, people have come up with all kinds of stories. people come up after conferences and it is almost as if somebody has a story of somebody they know or somebody they love. host: who is responsible? guest: i think there are no villains in this game. i think everybody is well intended. we have an opportunity for hospitals to increase the level of accountability by disclosing their patient outcomes. doctors' groups have come together and endorsed great ways to measure hospital quality. 2,000 track them at the patient level. do we think the public has a right to know about the quality of their hospitals? host: haven't we been tracking outcomes for 50 years? we just keep increasing the outcomes but it hasn't improved. guest: absolutely. there are all kinds of outcomes to attract. services grow and every hospital. a lot of people are falling through the cracks. we have great measures that doctors' groups i j
fake science behind them that is very popular in the anti-choice movement. >> when you combine that, laura, with the fact that at first when these legitimate rape comments came out, republicans started running from them, now they are stuck with them, let me give you an example. the chair of the gop, rins priebus, tried to distance himself from akin. here he is answering a reporter's question. >> if he stays in, is y'all's position eventually going to change in. >> no. no. no. he can be tied and we're not going to send him a penny. >> but now he's changed his tune. when he was asked if he thought akin was a better opg than mccaskill, priebus says is, quote, i have an obligation to make sure we win as many seats in the senate as possible. i mean, he's a real problem. >> there it is, reverend. i think a month ago republicans wouldn't touch akin with a ten-foot pole. i think the reason wasn't because they were so genuinely offended by akin's remarks but because they had no chance to win the senate race. they encouraged him to get out of the race hoping to replace them with a republican
his fake science theory about pregnancy and rape, he has also described his opponent, unladylike. they released video of him for spending time in jail and he is defending his vote against fair pay for women, not by saying that women don't suffer in terms of pay discrimination, but by saying instead that he just doesn't believe that discrimination is wrong. he doesn't believe that businesses should have to follow any laws about who they discriminate against. the government shouldn't tell you what you pay and what you don't pay. discrimination is just freedom for business owners who are getting a really good deal on their lady workers. republicans have to weigh how badly they want a republican candidate snar for missouri. they have to weigh that against how much it's going to cost them to be associated with the le jat mitt rape, your unladylike jailed abortion protesters i'm against civil rights guy in missouri. now he says that businesses should be able to discriminate in what t
straightforward guidance and be able to focus on other things, like each other, which isn't rocket science. it's just common sense. from td ameritrade. [ male announcer ] the exceedingly nimble, ridiculously agile, tight turning, fun to drive 2013 smart. ♪ >>> and we are back. thanks for watching "the ed show" tonight, folks. mitt romney is revealing his strategy for what could be one of the biggest nights of his campaign. big numbers here, folks. 52 million people are expected to watch next wednesday's debate with president obama. and mitt has a plan. he says he's going to go out and tell the truth. >> i think the president will not be able to continue to mischaracterize my pathway and so i'll be able to describe mine, he will describe his and people will make a choice. >> karl rove loves the idea. he wrote today in the "wall street journal," "mr. romney must call out the president and set the record straight in a presidential tone." sounds good. and romney's taken his advice to heart. in fact, he says there are three issues he needs to correct the president on. here's the first one -- >> w
and science teachers. we need that to move forward as a country. >> that's a total, though, right? >> educating -- training two million new workers in our community colleges in conjunction with business to fill jobs that are open right now. boosting american manufacturing by ending the tax break that sends jobs overseas and giving tax incentives to companies that start manufacturing businesses here. these are specific tangible proposals and, candy, i believe that they will pass because i believe the american people are supportive of that. >> but they haven't passed. >> it will be rendered on november 6 wrth. >> no, they haven't. >> for two years jobs -- >> some of the specific proposals haven't, but, candy, think about the logical extension of what you're saying. what you're saying is so we select the other guy because he will implement the proposals of the republican congress has pushed to cut taxes by $5 trillion skewed to the wealthy, can't pay for it. that will add burdens to the middle class to slash education, to slash research and development. >> i'm not suggesting -- >> he
is clearly -- doesn't even understand the science of a woman's body, over a democrat. that just seems kind of -- everything you're saying is right but just with todd akin he's not just like -- it wasn't a gaffe. it's just odd. >> remember it wasn't a gaffe. he sponsored a bill on this. >> yes. >> cosponsored by paul ryan. it wasn't just -- it wasn't a slip of the tongue. this was their position. the entire, you know, house had been, you know -- the tea party wing of the house had been fighting for this. >> the reason they can get away with it in this race, think back mark foley became a national issue in a congressional race in 2006 where it was bad for the party nationally. because it's a presidential year, there's so much more attention that's going to go on the presidential election it is likely the case that the party -- you won't have a national discussion over this anymore over -- even though you might in other cases. the price is probably relatively low. as ryan was saying, if they are amoral things more important to try to win the majority than worry about the longer term implicati
, rational thought. the current party has waged a war in science. climate denial is horrifying. it's war on reason. you cited former vice president dick cheney that deficits do not matter. karl rove said it that we create our own realities. you live in it. a romney pollsters said we will not be restricted by fact checkers. i refer to a post-truth world. the problem is the policy oriented. the party has been captured by people like grover norquist who is a ferocious anti-tax ideologue who has forced many members of the house and senate to abide by his pledge of no tax increases. where do you get the revenue to help build the country? when people talk about the deficit -- it is not the deficit or debt but joblessness which is the great crisis of our times. the deficit and debt did not arrive from some inaccurate conception. -- immaculate conception. two unfunded wars, medicare part d. let them speak to that. mitt romney has it fantastical approach to arithmetic. at the bottom of it, there is a commitment and an ideology to insuring that the top 1% make out real well. those most vulnerable
, attention and enthusiasm, it matters which voters turn out where. dave robertson, a political science professor at the university of missouri st. louis, says the topsy-turvy election has cut both ways. >> one of the things akin has been able to do is electrify some of the conservative base. but there's a counter movement to that. and at is he's also helped electrify some of the female voters in the state, some of the moderate voters in the state, some of the key voters in the suburbs of this state that are going to determine the outcome of this election. and that's a real disadvantage for him. >> ifill: akin is counting on conservatives, home schooling parents, and evangelicals to rally around his cause. >> we don't tell you who to vote for, but i'm going to tell you how to vote. >> ifill: reverend stoney shaw, pastor of ferguson first baptist church, has known akin for 25 years. >> some of my family, my children were, "dad, how can you support him? everybody is turning against him." i said, "you know, there was another guy everybody turned against-- jesus christ-- but he prevailed. a
right by medical science, is really critical for achieving health and preventing these diseases. so the green new deal is a win/win win because it gets us to clean energy which can stop the climate crisis, jump start our economy, creating three times as many jobs as every dollar spent in the fossil fuel economy, and it puts us back to work. so it's a win/win win all around. host: dawn, joining us from oxford, alabama with dr. jill stein, last call. good morning to you. caller: good morning. i kind of agree with an awful lot of what you said about the cause of all this. but the one thing that you admitted and i'm cureuse about, what would -- kaoeurous about, what would make a banker with the subprime mortgage, what would make him -- which the whole goal is to make money, as much as he can, what would make a banker loan money to somebody that he knows was not going to be able to pay him back? and then do they just think -- get a meeting and say we're going to create these instances where we're going to loan money for people to buyouts, paopl that can't pay it back and sell it to someb
was held up the wilson center in june on science and technology and innovation. the symposia, which the institute co-chairs foot china's state council, not only promote dialogue among the stakeholders but allow the participants to develop personal connections. the institute also recently released an initial report on u.s.-china security perceptions, and other big project we are working on with leading research institutions in the u.s. and beijing. just last month we published the u.s. cooperation and clean energy and the review of the difficulties both countries face in developing solar, wind and other alternative energy industries and the potential room for cooperation. last november, finally, henry participated in another one of our national conversations entitled afghanistan is there a regional and gamecocks the story on this is interesting. he resisted when he learned we get organized a brilliant panel of scholars and reporters to comment on his remarks to the and we hadn't cleared the names with him. he didn't know all the people, and he was not happy. but he gave brief remarks
was astonished to find that akin's sits on the science committee and he fails to understand 8th grade biology. it illustrates t point that we have 535 people to regulate everything but produce thing. we really need to step back and understand that his views and the views of an individual shouldn't be regulated by the government. he speaks for smaller government, yet he wants to push govnment morality on other individuals because they choose a different way of life. as your senator, i think the issues of abortion are really a wedge issue to take away and distract from the important issues like balancing the budgets and ending the wars and destroying your personal freedom. step back and take a look at the important issues. >> congressman akin, there were several characterizations of your position there. would oatlikoffer a chance of rebuttal? >> there were a few words ere. let's start with a couple really basic things. if you don't believe the federal government should do everything, it doesn't mean you don't believe in it. the question do you want the federal governmt to take over everything t
to lead us in an all- out search to advance our education, our learning, and our science and training, because this world is more complex and we're being pressed harder all the time. i believe in opening doors. we won the olympics, in part, because we've had civil rights laws and the laws that prohibit discrimination against women. i have been for those efforts all my life. the president's record is quite different. the question is our future. president kennedy once said in response to similar arguments, "we are great, but we can be greater.'' we can be better if we face our future, rejoice in our strengths, face our problems, and by solving them, build a better society for our children. thank you. >> thank you, mr. mondale. [applause] please, we have not finished quite yet. thank you, mr. mondale, and thank you, mr. president. and our thanks to our panel members, as well. and so we bring to a close this first of the league of women voters presidential debates of 1984. you two can go at each again in the final league debate on october 21st, in kansas city, missouri. and this thursday
the subjectivity out of it and you put science around it. so it gives you a benchmark for the products that you have. so when we start looking at that, what we did was we said okay, what are some other alternatives? how can we horne into this as -- honey into this -- hone into this aspect of this particular product. we looked at things from the food industry, for instance. when we did that we came up with the clean stem fluid which is sourced as you said entirely from the fluid industry. what that did by developing those right off the bat, we had two or three orders magnitude stepdown in the numbers. >> numbers of what? >> it's a relative ranking. if you look at one product just in round numbers, let's say it's got an 800, which is what we have been using, some are down to 300 this. >> in terms of what? >> the effects of health, safety and environmental standpoint. >> researching and developing the new recipes for fracking is very expensive. tens of millions of dollars i imagine. >> yes, sir. >> the company believes the existing process, the ones they have been using for years is safe. why is h
in political science 101, should be elected representative do what he believes is right or with a constituent thinks is right? you could give to the question one way or another. the important thing to take away from that is there is tension between the elected representative wants to do and what the constituent wants to do. no one wants to run from office so they can cast a lever from what the constituents to do. you want to be a candidate because you believe in something. nobody wants to just pull the lever for what the constituents want to do. all a super pak really can do is identify places where the election representative has gone out too far from the constituency and educate the electorate about how the elected representative is sideways with the public opinion of the people. take that advertisements the crossroads ran and were running in the states talking about how the president passed a stimulus program. the stimulus was widely -- wildly unpopular. all they can do is hold the president or another elected official and account for what they did. it cannot change public opinion about st
sense, it said that many doctors are not doing it. we did not really have a system for doing it. science explodes with information. we have new services that are mind-boggling. but the coordination of services and the standardization of best practices has lagged behind. one of the great things that i described in my book are the new generation of doctors. they think differently. they expect transparency in every aspect of life. that generation looks different from the old guard. they tend to be a second career, older, more women, and they try holistic care. they do yoga. they think differently and they expect honesty and they have very little tolerance for not telling the truth. they are changing health care today. that is one of the exciting things happening. host: dr. makary, to the states vary in how much accountability and transparency there is? guest: trend -- tremendously. not only to the state medical boards very, -- vary, but whether or not you know about your doctor's criminal background varies depending on what state you live in. some states make the complication rate public a
to actually do something that will be good for patients and good for science going forward so this is the one thing that didn't make it. the other little thick that didn't make it is now the safe dosage act, passed in the last minute, by the senate, and that's awaiting the president's signature, but one of the things that's necessary in terms of the resources is that this has to be a global enterprise. one of the things that is happening globally is the leading pharmaceutical companies in the united states, in europe, in japan have banded together to work with interpol to ensure they have enough resources to go after the bad guys around the world, and we've just started that. i think we're going to kick that off here next month. we've been discussing this with interpol, and we think we have a good program to help country's specific enforcement agencies with the global respective of interpol. yes, it costs money. it is money well spent, but more importantly, it gets us the heart of the trust that patients have to have in our medicines. >> ralph, i know as we've worked on the partnership and bu
Search Results 0 to 33 of about 34 (some duplicates have been removed)